MeetOur Physicians

  • Anas Alomar
    MD

    Dr. Anas Alomar is a cardiologist in North Richland Hills, Texas. He was born in Houston, Tx and received his medical degree from Damascus University Faculty of Medicine. Dr. Alomar has been in practice between 6-10 years. He is currently seeing new patients and he is board certified in Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases, and Internal Medicine.

  • Kenneth Johnson
    MD MBA FACC

    Dr. Johnson specializes in Interventional Cardiology, Vascular Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease and Endovascular Medicine.

  • Vijay S. Ramanath
    M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

    Dr. Ramanath was born and raised in Rochester, NY. He studied medicine at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, followed by internal medicine training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, PA.

  • Gautam Reddy
    M.D., M.S., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

    Dr. Gautam Reddy is a graduate of the Gandhi Medical College in Hyderabad, India and completed Residency at the University of Connecticut.

  • Stuart R. Lander
    M.D.

    Dr. Lander specializes in Interventional Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease.

Welcome to HeartPlace

Mission Statement:

HeartPlace is the past, present, and future of cardiology in North Texas. Founded almost 50 years ago, HeartPlace is the oldest and largest cardiovascular group in North Texas. From its small beginning in Dallas, HeartPlace has grown to over 70 physicians throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. HeartPlace has been an innovator in cardiovascular services, introducing to the North Texas area procedures such as coronary angiography, angioplasty, coronary stenting, and electrophysiology. This dedication to innovative techniques and procedures has guaranteed our patients the latest and most up-to-date cardiovascular services...

Heart Healthy Tips & News

  • Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementia

    A large, long-term study suggests that middle aged Americans who have vascular health risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking, have a greater chance of suffering from dementia later in life.

    Source: Science Daily

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  • Abdominal Fat Most Strongly Linked to Hypertension Risk

    The association between obesity and the development of hypertension appears to be driven specifically by visceral adiposity, according to research published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Alvin Chandra, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues followed 903 normotensive participants of the Dallas Heart Study (median age, 40 years; 57 percent women; 60 percent nonwhite; median body mass index, 27.5 kg/m˛) for a median of seven years to monitor the development of hypertension. Imaging studies were used to assess adiposity, including visceral adiposity. Source: Physician’sBriefing Read More Read More

  • Breakthrough: Statin treatment reduces risk of cardiovascular disease in women

    A large international study has shown conclusively that statin treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The research confirms that statins are beneficial not only to women who have already had a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke, but also in those who - whilst they have not yet developed cardiovascular disease -- are at an increased risk of such diseases. Source: Science Daily Read More Read More

  • Medtronic gains FDA approval for longer DCB to treat patients with SFA disease

    Medtronic announced that the FDA has approved a longer length of its drug-coated balloon for treatment of superficial femoral artery disease. http://www.healio.com/cardiac-vascular-intervention/peripheral/news/online/%7Bc4d7b439-44fc-4dd4-a5dc-267c2eef0582%7D/medtronic-gains-fda-approval-for-longer-dcb-to-treat-patients-with-sfa-disease Read More

  • Study links common male medical condition and vascular disease

    Men with varicoceles appear to be more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and diabetes than those without the condition, according to a study published in Andrology.1

    Read More

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